Annual Flowers for Full Sun

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Lawn & Garden

©2007 Publications International, Ltd. See more pictures of annual flowers.

If your garden gets six to eight hours of direct sunlight daily, you have a plethora of options for annual flowers of various colors, shapes, and sizes. However, it’s important to observe the amount of sunlight different areas of your garden receive, especially when trees and shrubs are in full foliage and casting more shade, before planting.

Annuals Image Gallery

Don’t worry if your garden lacks full sunlight. You can still plant annuals that thrive in partial or full shade, such as Coleus. Alternatively, you can create a sunny area in your garden by removing obstructions like branches or fences that block the light.

This page provides links to annual flowers categorized by their light requirements and colors. Keep in mind that insufficient sunlight will result in fewer blooms.

Full Sun Annuals with Blue to Purple Colors:

  • Bachelor’s Button, Cornflower
  • Heliotrope, Cherry Pie
  • Lantana
  • Lisianthus, Prairie Gentian
  • Nierembergia, Cup Flower
  • Nigella, Love in a Mist
  • Perilla
  • Sweet Alyssum

Edible Full Sun Annuals:

  • Basil
  • Capsicum, Peppers

Full Sun Annual Grasses and Foliage:

  • Basil
  • Capsicum, Peppers
  • Dusty Miller
  • Gazania, Treasure Flower
  • Geranium Zonal
  • Globe Amaranth
  • Nigella, Love in a Mist
  • Perilla

Full Sun Annuals with Multicolors:

  • Amaranthus, Summer Poinsettia
  • Bachelor’s Button, Cornflower
  • Calendula, Pot Marigold
  • Celosia
  • Cleome, Spider Flower
  • Cosmos
  • Dahlia
  • Gazania, Treasure Flower
  • Geranium, Zonal
  • Globe Amaranth
  • Petunia
  • Portulaca, Moss Rose
  • Snapdragon
  • Swan River Daisy
  • Sweet Pea
  • Verbena
  • Zinnia

Full Sun Annuals with Pink to Fuchsia Colors:

  • Bachelor’s Button, Cornflower
  • Celosia
  • Cleome, Spider Flower
  • Lantana
  • Lavatera, Rose Mallow
  • Lisianthus, Prairie Gentian
  • Nigella, Love in a Mist
  • Sweet Alyssum
  • Vinca, Madagascar Periwinkle

Full Sun Annuals with Red Colors:

  • Amaranthus, Summer Poinsettia
  • Calendula, Pot Marigold
  • Capsicum, Peppers
  • Celosia
  • Lantana
  • Nasturtium
  • Vinca, Madagascar Periwinkle

Full Sun Annuals with White to Green Colors:

  • Amaranthus, Summer Poinsettia
  • Bachelor’s Button, Cornflower
  • Calendula, Pot Marigold
  • Cleome, Spider Flower
  • Lisianthus, Prairie Gentian
  • Nigella, Love in a Mist
  • Sweet Alyssum
  • Vinca, Madagascar Periwinkle

Full Sun Annuals:

  • Amaranthus, Summer Poinsettia
  • Calendula, Pot Marigold
  • California Poppy
  • Capsicum, Peppers
  • Celosia
  • Coreopsis
  • Dahlberg Daisy Golden Fleece
  • Lantana
  • Marigold
  • Melampodium
  • Nasturtium
  • Sunflower

Full Sun and Partial Shade Annuals:

  • Ageratum, Floss Flower
  • Browallia, Sapphire Flower
  • Lobelia
  • Nicotiana, Flowering Tobacco
  • Pansy, Viola
  • Salvia, Scarlet Sage
  • Sanvitallia, Creeping Zinnia

Full Sun, Partial Shade, and Full Shade Annuals:

  • Wax Begonia, Fibrous Begonia

Can’t find what you’re looking for? Check out our Annual Flowers, Annuals, or Full Sun Perennials sections for more information.

FAQ

1. What are full sun annuals?

Full sun annuals are plants that thrive in direct sunlight for most of the day. They are typically planted in the spring or summer and provide vibrant colors and foliage throughout the season. Full sun annuals are perfect for adding color to gardens, borders, and containers.

2. What are some examples of full sun annuals?

Some examples of full sun annuals include marigolds, petunias, zinnias, sunflowers, and impatiens. These plants have vibrant colors and can grow to be quite tall and full. They are perfect for adding a pop of color to any outdoor space.

3. How do I care for full sun annuals?

Full sun annuals require regular watering, especially during hot and dry periods. They also benefit from regular fertilization to promote healthy growth and vibrant colors. Deadheading spent blooms can also encourage new growth and prolong the blooming period.

4. Can full sun annuals be grown in containers?

Yes, full sun annuals can be grown in containers. In fact, they are a popular choice for container gardens as they can add color and interest to patios, balconies, and other small spaces. When planting in containers, be sure to use a well-draining soil and water regularly.

5. How do I choose full sun annuals for my garden?

When choosing full sun annuals for your garden, consider the colors and heights that will complement your existing landscape. Look for plants that have healthy foliage and avoid those with yellowing leaves or signs of pests. Also, consider the amount of sun exposure your garden receives and choose plants that can thrive in those conditions.

6. Can full sun annuals attract pollinators?

Yes, full sun annuals can attract pollinators such as bees and butterflies. Plants like zinnias and sunflowers are particularly attractive to pollinators and can help support local ecosystems. By planting full sun annuals, you can create a vibrant and thriving garden that supports local wildlife.

7. How long do full sun annuals typically bloom?

The blooming period for full sun annuals can vary depending on the plant species and growing conditions. Some annuals may bloom for several months, while others may only bloom for a few weeks. Regular deadheading and fertilization can help prolong the blooming period and keep your plants looking their best.

8. How do I propagate full sun annuals?

Full sun annuals can be propagated through seed or cuttings. To propagate through seed, collect the seed pods from mature plants and plant them in a well-draining soil in the spring. To propagate through cuttings, take a cutting from a healthy plant and place it in a container with moist soil. Keep the container in a warm and humid area and wait for the cutting to take root.

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