Coralbell, Alumroot

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Lawn & Garden

Coralbell, also called alumroot, is a type of perennial flower that comes in multiple colors. These flowers have small leaves and reddish spikes above them. Coralbells have been extensively bred, resulting in a diverse range of perennials with large, lobed leaves that come in shades of green, silver, and purple. These leaves grow in basal rosettes from thick rootstocks. The flowers are small and come in clusters on stems that are one to two feet tall. Some of these flowers are very showy, while others are grown primarily for their foliage. Most coralbells bloom in the spring, but a few bloom in summer or fall.

If you want to grow coralbells, they prefer full sun but can also tolerate partial shade in areas with hot summers. Plant them in good quality, well-drained soil that has a high humus content and keep the soil moist during the summer. In winter, coralbells don’t like wet soil and may die if their roots are wet. To prevent overcrowding, divide them every three years.

You can propagate coralbells by either dividing them in the spring or growing them from seed. These flowers look lovely in borders or planted among rocks, rock walls, and rock gardens. There are several related species of coralbell, including Heuchera americana, which is the native type and has good leaf color. H. micrantha and H. villosa have larger and more varied leaves, but H. villosa requires more shade than other species. The scientific name for coralbells is Heuchera hybrids.

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FAQ

1. What are Coralbells and Alumroots?

Coralbells and Alumroots are two types of perennial flowering plants that belong to the Saxifragaceae family. They are commonly grown in gardens for their attractive foliage and colorful flowers.

2. What are the distinguishing features of Coralbells?

Coralbells have scalloped or ruffled leaves in a variety of colors, ranging from green to deep purple. They also produce delicate bell-shaped flowers on tall stems in late spring or early summer.

3. What are the distinguishing features of Alumroots?

Alumroots have large, rounded leaves that are often deeply lobed or toothed. They produce clusters of small, star-shaped flowers in shades of white, pink, or red in late spring or early summer.

4. How do you care for Coralbells and Alumroots?

Coralbells and Alumroots prefer well-draining soil and partial shade, although they can tolerate full sun in cooler climates. They should be watered regularly and fertilized in the spring and fall. Deadheading spent flowers can encourage additional blooms.

5. What are some common varieties of Coralbells?

Some popular Coralbell varieties include ‘Palace Purple’, ‘Electric Lime’, ‘Obsidian’, and ‘Caramel’.

6. What are some common varieties of Alumroots?

Some common Alumroot varieties include ‘Heuchera americana’, ‘Heuchera sanguinea’, and ‘Heuchera micrantha’.

7. Are Coralbells and Alumroots invasive?

Coralbells and Alumroots are generally not invasive, but they can spread via rhizomes and self-seeding in ideal growing conditions.

8. What are some common pests and diseases that affect Coralbells and Alumroots?

Coralbells and Alumroots are susceptible to leaf spot, rust, and powdery mildew. They may also be eaten by slugs, snails, and deer.

9. Can Coralbells and Alumroots be grown in containers?

Yes, Coralbells and Alumroots can be grown in containers as long as the container is large enough to accommodate their root systems and the soil is well-draining.

10. Can Coralbells and Alumroots be propagated?

Yes, Coralbells and Alumroots can be propagated by division in the spring or fall. It is also possible to propagate them from seed.

11. How do you use Coralbells and Alumroots in landscaping?

Coralbells and Alumroots are often used in borders, rock gardens, and woodland gardens for their attractive foliage and colorful flowers. They can also be used as ground covers or in container plantings.

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